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Theater 2019-20: Goodman turns its spotlight
on women in themes personal, social, funny

Sep 15, 2019 – 9:41 pm
Dana H.

Fourth in a series of season previews: It wasn’t exactly planned that way, says Goodman Theatre managing producer Adam Belcuore, but when all the pieces were in place for 2019-20, the company had settled on a season dominated by women and women’s issues. “Whether consciously or unconsciously, we arrived at a female-centric season,” says Belcuore. Goodman opens Sept. 16 with the world premiere of Lucas Hnath’s “Dana H.,” essentially a one-woman play about the real-life abduction of his mother.

At Stratford Festival, veteran struts his comic stuff as Falstaff and madcap Coward character

Sep 11, 2019 – 5:28 pm
Private Lives – On The Run 2019

Review: It isn’t exactly a double-header, but it surely is a Wyn-Wyn for the Stratford Festival’s versatile star actor Geraint Wyn Davies. His delightful romps as Shakespeare’s roguish Sir John Falstaff in “The Merry Wives of Windsor” and as Noel Coward’s do-over divorcee in “Private Lives” are reason enough to make the Ontario festival trek from just about any distance. ★★★★/★★★★

Theater 2019-20: Victory Gardens will churn American melting pot, the stuff of our totality

Sep 9, 2019 – 10:37 pm
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Third in a series of season previews: “Diversity is what makes this country unique,” says Victory Gardens Theatre artistic director Chay Yew. “As Americans, we inherit all American histories. Our coming season is about our diversity – the differences that represent our totality.” The season opens with Janet Ulrich Brooks playing a personal advice columnist in an adaptation of Cheryl Strayed’s book “Tiny Beautiful Things.”

Theater 2019-20: Shattered Globe cues plays bringing new perspectives on this old world

Sep 6, 2019 – 5:00 pm
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Second in a series of season previews: Sandy Shinner, in her sixth season as artistic director of Shattered Globe Theatre, describes a common thread running through the company’s new season of three plays as “seeing the world in a new way.” One’s personal world, she means, of course: “You think you know where you stand, then something happens and you have to recalibrate.” Shattered Globe opens with Deborah Zoe Laufer’s “Be Here Now,” an edgy comedy about a confirmed nihilist whose peculiar crisis is finding happiness.

‘The Glass Menagerie’ at the Shaw Festival: In a broken world, illusion collides with reality

Sep 3, 2019 – 3:13 pm
The Glass Menagerie

Review: Before the scripted play begins in the Shaw Festival’s searing production of Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass Menagerie” in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, the actor who will play the trapped, desperately yearning Tom Wingfield performs magic tricks for the audience. Wearing a knitted cap, he looks like a street person. Maybe we aren’t looking at a prelude at all; perhaps this is the epilogue – the fate of an aspiring poet who ultimately flees from his dead-end life as sole provider for his domineering, erstwhile Southern belle of a mother and his crippled, withdrawn, psychologically damaged sister. ★★★★★

‘Into the Woods’ at Writers: Fairy-tale delights spun on life’s loom – fantasy and hard lessons

Sep 1, 2019 – 10:01 am
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Review: The woods are as menacing as ever, but the production of “Into the Woods,” the Stephen Sondheim-James Lapine musical fairy tale currently running at Writers Theatre in Glencoe, is utterly luminous. Sondheim and Lapine pulled off a miracle with their 1986 show, deftly exploring the deep philosophical and moral questions lurking below the surface of a seemingly frothy mashup of fairy tales featuring, among others, Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Jack (of beanstalk fame) and a wily witch. ★★★★★

Theater 2019-20: From woods to tennis court and date with Death, Writers plots a fresh trek

Aug 26, 2019 – 6:25 pm
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First in a series of season previews: Contemplating the diverse and intriguing 2019-20 series of plays underway at Writers Theatre Artistic director Michael Halberstam sums up the challenge of programming and its progression from year to year. “I’d like to think we learn something every season,” he offers with unembroidered simplicity. “We want to be in tune with the times, to reflect the moment – to present a genuinely diverse season.”

Stratford Festival: Othello may be no match for Iago, but these two actors go toe to toe

Aug 14, 2019 – 7:04 pm
Michael Blake as Othello and Amelia Sargisson as Desdemona in Othello. Photography by David Hou.

Review: When the full, remorseless malevolence of Shakespeare’s villain Iago spills across the stage, it can be hard to find the title character in “Othello.” But even pitted against Gordon S. Miller’s sinister nemesis in the Stratford Festival’s current production, Michael Blake brings front and center both the heroic stature and the tragic vulnerability of a great general brought down by a handkerchief. ★★★★★

Romp in the woods at American Players: A lusty, stylish go at ‘She Stoops To Conquer’

Jul 25, 2019 – 12:06 pm
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Review: Oliver Goldsmith’s broad comedy “She Stoops to Conquer” has been around for nearly 250 years, one of the few 18th-century British plays to hold the stage in this country despite the great displacement of time and place. Charming, LOL funny and warm-hearted, “She Stoops to Conquer” is a smashing success at American Players Theatre in Spring Green, Wis. It’s an ensemble coup but also a particular triumph for Laura Rook as an aristocratic girl who sheds her fine mantle to win the heart of a hopelessly shy peer. ★★★★

Tennessee Williams’ rare gem ‘Creve Coeur’ gets a lyrical polishing at American Players

Jul 19, 2019 – 11:27 am
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Review: “A Lovely Sunday for Creve Coeur,” an obscure play by Tennessee Williams from late in his life, serves up a touching, trenchant, typically insightful and empathic look at aging womanhood – four women in this instance – in a production at American Players Theatre that reveals a hidden gem by the incomparable singer of America’s Southern song. ★★★★★

‘True West’ at Steppenwolf: Warring brothers
go to the mat over fame, fortune and spelling

Jul 18, 2019 – 8:26 am
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Review: It’s a surreal encounter and also a never-ending story, Sam Shepard’s slugfest of a play “True West,” which sprawls across the stage at in a lusty, mad and magnetic production at Steppenwolf Theatre. The tattered remains of actors Jon Michael Hill and Namir Smallwood, who had just endured a mutual pummeling as contentious brothers unexpectedly and most unhappily reunited, shared in bravely earned applause at the show’s opening July 16. ★★★★

Shakespeare at American Players: Some have greatness thrust on them; others, not so much

Jul 17, 2019 – 11:09 am
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Review: American Players Theatre, now in its 40th summer of primarily outdoor productions in a charming little arena in the hills of Spring Green, Wis., some 30 miles west of Madison, has always regarded Shakespeare as its badge of honor, reference point and indeed its reason for being. That tradition is manifest in a spirited and sure production of “Twelfth Night,” but a dubiously conceived and oddly cast “Macbeth” betrays this excellent company’s allegiance to the Bard. “Twelfth Night” ★★★★ “Macbeth” ★★

‘King Lear’ at Redtwist: The existential Bard, pared to the core of being – and nothingness

Jul 15, 2019 – 8:41 pm
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Review: Redtwist Theatre, the fearless vest-pocket company in Edgewater, winds up its season, the last for co-founder and artistic director Michael Colucci at the helm, with its first venture into Shakesespeare: a lean, uneven “King Lear,” but one altogether imposing in Brian Parry’s assured, fierce and affecting performance in the title role. ★★★

‘The Music Man’ at Goodman: He’s a what, he’s a what? He’s a music man. No, he ain’t.

Jul 12, 2019 – 6:10 pm
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Review: Yes, my friends, we got trouble, right here in Windy City. I’m talkin’ about a Goodman Theatre production of “The Music Man” – a musical, the last I heard – that’s about as musical as Amaryllis’ cross-hand piece at the piano. And by the way, the show also lacks an actor in the title role with a real feel for that two-bit, gol-dang, smooth-talkin’, tin-horn, two-timin’ salesman: someone, in short, who knows the territory. ★★

Kalmar, Grant Park forces take on Beethoven’s mighty Missa Solemnis and serve up a thrilla

Jun 29, 2019 – 7:44 pm
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Review: It’s hard to say which was the more remarkable, music director Carlos Kalmar’s sheer chutzpah in programming Beethoven’s monumental and indeed daunting Missa Solemnis for the Grant Park Music Festival or the thrilling success of the June 28 performance by all the vocal and instrumental forces involved.

‘If I Forget’ at Victory Gardens: The human comedy in past, present and future imperfect

Jun 27, 2019 – 7:55 am
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Review: The ingredients of Steven Levenson’s brutally honest play “If I Forget” are the stuff of human frailty: hubris, folly, hypocrisy, naïveté, denial. All compacted into one dysfunctional family, and sharply etched in a riveting production at Victory Gardens. ★★★★

American Players Theatre, set for its 40th year, cues the Bard, Tennessee and August Wilson

Jun 14, 2019 – 9:00 am
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Preview: American Players Theatre, nestled in the woodland hills near Spring Green, Wis., about 30 miles west of Madison, rolls out its 40th summer June 15 with Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” and Shaw’s “The Man of Destiny,” to be followed by seven more productions during a season that runs into early November. Says artistic director Brenda DeVita, now in her sixth year: “Our job is not to preserve, but to create. We are always changing.”

Role Playing: Maurice Jones wasn’t shooting
for CST’s Hamlet – but it simply was to be

Jun 3, 2019 – 3:16 pm
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Interview: Maurice Jones, who plays the title role in Chicago Shakespeare Theater’s current production of “Hamlet,” apparently made quite an impression at his audition. Actually, he overshot just a bit. He was trying out for the supporting part of Laertes. Jones had never played Hamlet, but when the actor who originally won the job had to back out, CST artistic director Barbara Gaines, who also directs this show, asked Jones if he’d be game to step up – and take on one of the greatest and most challenging roles in theater.

‘Miracle,’ a musical memory of the 2016 Cubs, drives nostalgia to deep center – back, back…

Jun 2, 2019 – 7:43 pm
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Review: “Miracle,” a new musical about the 2016 Chicago Cubs at the Royal George Theatre with music and lyrics by Michael Mahler and book by Jason Brett, extends its charming lure especially to that subset of devout Cubs fans who remember exactly where they were at 11:47 p.m. (Chicago time) Nov. 2, 2016, when the North Siders won their first World Series in 108 years. It’s a luxurious dip into unbridled nostalgia. ★★★

‘Winter’s Tale’ at Goodman: Clearing the high dramatic hurdle, crashing on rustic comedy

May 28, 2019 – 8:08 am
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Review: Shakespeare’s “The Winter’s Tale,” which begins with an outrageous and apparently unprovoked display of jealousy by a king toward his beloved wife and their best friend, works in its most problematic moments with rare plausibility and conviction thanks to director Robert Falls and an impeccably gauged performance by Dan Donohue. Yet the Goodman Theatre production also goes off the rails where the going seems easiest – in broad comedy. ★★★

‘Killing Game’ at Red Orchid: They’re dropping like flies in a wacky plague on all their houses

May 15, 2019 – 4:40 pm
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Review: Eugène Ionesco’s “Killing Game” won’t solve life’s Big Riddle – why we’re here at all – for you. But this imaginative production directed by Dado will provide you with acidly brilliant company at A Red Orchid Theatre, where 13 skilled actors play many, many roles – because otherwise their parts would have been exceedingly brief. The citizens are dropping dead in dizzying succession, and in often ridiculous fashion, of an unknown cause. ★★★★

‘West Side Story’ at Lyric Opera of Chicago:
New love and old hatred stirred at high heat

May 9, 2019 – 9:43 am
5/2/19 2:46:06 PM -- Chicago, IL

Lyric Opera Chicago
West Side Story Dress Rehearsal



© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2019

Review: By now, Lyric Opera of Chicago can claim an impressive string of spring musicals, hugely popular explorations of classic Americana that appear like shining exclamation marks at the end of regular opera seasons. The latest, “West Side Story,” well may be the finest. Indeed, you might be hard pressed ever to find a more profoundly satisfying account of this exquisite music-drama, which shares with its model, Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” both its bittersweet hope and its timeless tragedy. ★★★★★

‘Hamlet’ at Chicago Shakespeare: In honoring Bard’s language, an actor hones ambivalence

Apr 30, 2019 – 8:14 pm
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Review: The much that is good about Chicago Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” is very good indeed, starting with Maurice Jones’ rigorously thought-through and yet convincingly spontaneous performance as the melancholy Prince of Denmark. But unevenness among the rest of the principal roles takes a toll on this enterprise under company artistic director Barbara Gaines. ★★★★

‘A Number’ at Writers: Haunted by the past, dad seeks ideal son in future perfect of DNA

Apr 28, 2019 – 9:38 pm
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Review: Salter’s little boy was perfect. Beautiful. In his father’s eyes, the child Bernard was everything a man could wish for. Then, something happened. What, exactly, is the conundrum at the core of Caryl Churchill’s intriguing futuristic play “A Number,” in which William Brown and Nate Burger now occupy the stage at Writers Theatre. ★★★★

‘Hannah and Martin’ at Shattered Globe: Fireworks of mind and heart as the Reich rises

Apr 25, 2019 – 5:46 pm
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Review: In a Chicago theater season that has produced a generous share of first-rate work, there’s been little that might top the brilliance and torment generated by Christina Gorman and Lawrence Grimm in Kate Fodor’s “Hannah and Martin” at Shattered Globe Theatre. It’s a story as mesmerizing as it is heated and exotic, this historical – and historically sound – romantic affair and intellectual tussle between two of the most influential philosophers of the last century: Martin Heidegger, a Nazi sympathizer, and the Jewish thinker Hannah Arendt, ★★★★★

‘The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey’: Charismatic gay boy, sundry friends, one actor

Apr 19, 2019 – 4:15 pm
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Review: What’s so seductively marvelous about Joe Foust’s one-man turn through James Lecesne’s bittersweet play “The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey,” currently in production at American Blues Theater, is not simply the actor’s ability to sustain a complicated narrative alone on the stage. What’s absolutely magical is Foust’s blink-of-an-eye transformations from one fully formed character into another, each new persona as distinctive, empathic and credible as the last. ★★★★

‘For Colored Girls’ at Court: Getting through hard lives with a distant promise of rainbows

Apr 11, 2019 – 9:29 am
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Review: You have half a dozen more chances to see Ntozake Shange’s stunning play “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf” before it closes April 14 at Court Theatre. That is, assuming a seat opens up; the remainder of the run is sold out. No surprise there. “For Colored Girls” is a theatrical experience of authentic soul and rare beauty. ★★★★★

‘Sweat’ at Goodman: When the jobs go away, even best friends can lose sight of forever

Apr 1, 2019 – 6:12 pm
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Review: The tragic grandeur of Lynn Nottage’s play “Sweat,” now indispensably on display at Goodman Theatre, resides in its complex truths. All in one remarkable tumble, it is a play about the vulnerability of the labor class, the crassness of their overlords, the fragility of friendships, the partitions of tribalism and the volatile bond between mothers and sons. ★★★★★

‘Herland’ at Redtwist: Three senior ladies give new meaning to garage band’s sacred domain

Mar 23, 2019 – 4:47 pm
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Review: As shaggy dog stories go, Grace McLeod’s “Herland,” now rollicking about in the very small space of Redtwist Theatre, is funny from start almost to finish. The show derives its nearly nonstop energy and substantial appeal from three middle-aged actresses and a convincingly vulnerable young actress playing in a you-are-there garage set. Right at the finish line, however, “Herland” makes a sudden shift from high comedy to self-conscious morality tale and concludes in an awkward effort to make its point. ★★★

Steppenwolf to create new theater building, centerpiece of $73 million renewal project

Mar 5, 2019 – 12:12 pm
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Report: Steppenwolf Theatre unveiled plans March 5 for a new state-of-the-art theater building, the heart of a $73 million renovation project that ultimately will include remodeling of the company’s current main-stage theater. The new building is expected to open in summer 2021. “This is a monumental moment for us that is more than two decades in the making,” said artistic director Anna D. Shapiro, adding that the expansion plan is “built on the shoulders of the former leaders, the ensemble, the board, and the staff who have touched this project and together have made this vision a reality.”