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After a quick, fraught trek, peripatetic pianist picks up Beethoven sonatas where he left off

Nov 10, 2019 – 11:08 pm
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Review: If it’s Sunday, it must be Chicago. Had Rudolf Buchbinder strode to the piano to begin his second Beethoven recital in four days at Orchestra Hall, and mistakenly launched into a Mozart sonata, it might have been understandable – if you knew what the pianist’s previous 24 hours had been like. The night before his Nov. 10 matinee program of Beethoven sonatas at Orchestra Hall, Buchbinder had played Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 at Carnegie Hall in New York, with the Bavarian Radio Orchestra. And an 11th-hour substitute conductor – Vasily Petrenko, standing in for the suddenly ill Mariss Jansons.

Muti goes all in with German Romantic music, as a pair of soloists from CSO light up Brahms

Nov 9, 2019 – 1:04 pm
CSO Wagner Brahms Schumann

Review: Maybe it’s just in keeping with his season-long Beethoven theme, but Chicago Symphony music director Riccardo Muti’s program for concerts Nov. 7-12 at Orchestra Hall is planted squarely at the heart of German Romanticism after Beethoven’s death in 1827. Wagner. Schumann. Brahms. Theodore Thomas, the CSO’s founding music director, might have put together just such a bill of fare in the 1890s, except then Brahms’ Concerto for Violin and Cello would have been (nearly) contemporary music, and even the “Flying Dutchman” Overture would have borne an echo of the lately deceased Wagner’s bold spirit.

Rudolf Buchbinder enters the Beethoven fray
in a blaze of technical glory, but lacking heat

Nov 7, 2019 – 5:47 pm
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Review: Listening to Rudolf Buchbinder zip through four Beethoven sonatas, his playing as crisp and sure as it was fleet, I found myself wondering if this is how Beethoven might have performed these pieces –  two early sonatas and the formidable “Appassionata.” It’s not that I thought Buchbinder’s approach was ideal; I didn’t. In fact, for all his impeccable technique, which never failed him even in the “Appassionata’s” blazing finish, and much as I admired his clarity and consistency, I kept hoping for more personality, more emotional complexity.

Two stars of CSO see great fun in challenge of Brahms’ towering concerto for violin, cello

Nov 6, 2019 – 7:01 pm
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Interview: The two soloists who tackle Brahms’ Concerto for Violin and Cello with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in performances Nov. 7-12, under the baton of music director Riccardo Muti, will be very familiar faces to regulars at Orchestra Hall – Stephanie Jeong, the CSO’s associate concertmaster, and Kenneth Olsen, the assistant principal cello. They see Brahms’ monumental concerto as a challenge, sure – but more than that, great fun.

‘Dead Man Walking’ at Lyric Opera of Chicago: To killer facing death, a nun bears love’s balm

Nov 5, 2019 – 4:57 pm
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Review: The silence, the phenomenal silence in that huge opera house, spoke loudly about the music-drama unfolding onstage: imminent death awaiting the brutal murderer of two teenagers and the desperate effort by a nun to help this roughcut sociopath, now reduced to a tormented and frightened soul, find peace before his execution. This is “Dead Man Walking,” the magnificent opera by composer Jake Heggie and librettist Terrence McNally, brought to life once more through a shattering confluence of music and theater at Lyric Opera of Chicago. ★★★★★

Muti, CSO deliver turmoil of Rands’ ‘Dream,’ and a Beethoven Violin Concerto for the ages

Nov 3, 2019 – 5:31 pm
CSO November 1 2019

Review: It was a dream musical encounter of parts Nov. 1 at Orchestra Hall: the Chicago Symphony Orchestra with music director Riccardo Muti offering the world premiere of Bernard Rands’ “Dream” and a consummate – and certainly novel – performance of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto with the Greek wizard Leonidas Kavakos.

Haymarket snares a fire-breathing send-up of Handel in naughty (and smart) Baroque farce

Nov 1, 2019 – 11:39 am
Dragon of Wantley David Govertsen ATCPhoto - HOC-9

Review: John Frederick Lampe’s opera “The Dragon of Wantley” is a double send-up, which makes it ancient kin to Broadway’s “Spamalot.” The 1737 comic opera was based on a rustic Yorkshire legend about a dragon that devours children “as one would eat an apple,” and the monster’s slaying by a Falstaffian braggart and boozer who gets lucky with a sword. But “The Dragon of Wantley” is also a deadpan musical spoof of Handel, who was huge in London opera at the time. The droll burlesque bubbled out of the pit in a superb revival by Chicago’s vest-pocket Haymarket Opera Company. ★★★★

David Afkham, a young conductor ascending, scores triple triumph with Chicago Symphony

Oct 31, 2019 – 8:30 am
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Review: David Afkham, German born and 36 years old, has the look of a conductor on a straight line to an eminent place in the world. He just wrapped up his second visit in three years with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, this time a program of core orchestral repertoire: Haydn’s Symphony No. 44 in E minor (“Mourning”), Richard Strauss’ “Death and Transfiguration” and Brahms’ Symphony No. 3. Whatever questions might have lingered about this young conductor were answered in spades. Together, Afkham and the CSO were spectacular.

In separate recitals – and worlds – two singers explore rich realms of Mahler and early music

Oct 29, 2019 – 9:19 am
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Review: It was as near the alpha and omega of voice recitals as might be encountered in a span of less than two days: baritone Christian Gerhaher in an all-Mahler program with pianist Gerold Huber, followed by countertenor Iestyn Davies singing mainly Renaissance and Baroque fare with the British viol consort Fretwork, both at the University of Chicago. Though worlds apart by any reckoning, the one was as magical as the other.

Music of the Baroque puts on hunting weeds for romp over 18th-century fields and streams

Oct 24, 2019 – 9:44 am
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Review: The only thing lacking in Music of the Baroque’s clever and far-bounding concert pitched around the hunt Oct. 22 at the Harris Theater was the valkyrie Brünnhilde’s lusty “Hojotoho!” It would have fit right in with this celebration of the thrill and glory of pursuit.

Orchestre symphonique de Montréal, playing
in several perfect accents, delivers a thriller

Oct 16, 2019 – 3:14 pm
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Review: It was quite some display of virtuosity, of sure-fire musical panache, that the Montreal Symphony Orchestra and music director Kent Nagano offered Oct. 15 at Orchestra Hall. With a sumptuous encore of Ravel’s grandly wrought “La valse,” the visitors might have been saying, “We can do this all night.” But by that point, after a sterling account of Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra, Nagano’s splendid ensemble was beyond needing to prove anything. “La valse,” opulent and sensuous and undulating, wasn’t so much a statement as a gift.

With a recital beyond ambitious, series opens celebrating Beethoven’s 32 piano sonatas

Oct 16, 2019 – 11:27 am
Kirill Gerstein Marco Borggreve

Review: Hard to know if it was in the spirit of the Chicago Marathon or what, but the Russian-American pianist Kirill Gerstein opened the Chicago Symphony Center’s nine-part season-long Beethoven 250 celebration of the composer’s 32 piano sonatas with a recital Oct. 13 that definitely went the extra mile. Having delivered a fresh, rhythmically electric and often playful account of five relatively early Beethoven sonatas, Gerstein unleashed – as an encore, no less – Beethoven’s formidable “Eroica” Variations.

‘Luisa Miller’ at Lyric Opera of Chicago: Verdi rarity is a happy augury for Mazzola era

Oct 14, 2019 – 10:42 am
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Review: We shall see whether Lyric Opera of Chicago, when it comes under the musical leadership of Enrique Mazzola in 2021, pursues the plan of departing music director Andrew Davis to explore the early, less familiar operas of Giuseppe Verdi. The idea has merit, and I think Mazzola will stick with it. There are signs to support that probability in the example immediately at hand: Verdi’s “Luisa Miller,” which Mazzola himself conducts with spirit, insight and evident belief in the opera’s worth. ★★★

Pianist Kirill Gerstein, launching Beethoven sonata cycle, sees works as mirror of struggle

Oct 12, 2019 – 3:44 pm
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Interview: Pianist Kirill Gerstein, who leads off a season-long excursion through Beethoven’s 32 piano sonatas to be performed by a parade of virtuosos at Orchestra Hall, views the sonatas not only as the composer’s most personal medium but also as an inventive progression sometimes skewed in modern reckoning – and sometimes unduly sanctified.

It’s two years until he takes Lyric Opera reins, but Enrique Mazzola already feels like family

Oct 11, 2019 – 3:15 pm
Enrique Mazzola Jean-Baptiste Millot feature image

Interview: The year 2019 has been for Enrique Mazzola an intense and rewarding breakthrough year he’ll remember for the rest of his life. Named music director designate at Lyric Opera of Chicago, effective with the 2021-22 season, Mazzola talks about learning the ropes in Berlin, Sazburg, New York and Paris and his desire to bring all that experience “energetically to the Lyric,” which he envisions as “a big music home for everybody.”

Rising conductor shows his mettle with CSO in Shostakovich symphony, concerto premiere

Oct 6, 2019 – 10:49 pm
10/3/19 8:33:24 PM -- Chicago, IL USA
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
James Gaffigan conductor
Cynthia Yeh percussion

Dorman Eternal Rhythm [United States Premiere]
Shostakovich Symphony No. 8


© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2019

Review: James Gaffigan, winner 15 years ago of the Sir Georg Solti International Conducting Competition at age 25, is checking off debuts with the world’s major orchestras and opera companies with work that is typically vibrant and rhythmically vigorous. As the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s first guest conductor this season, Gaffigan displayed his musical authority in two substantial and challenging works – Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 8 and the U.S. premiere of Avner Dorman’s “Eternal Rhythm,” a percussion concerto with CSO principal Cynthia Yeh as soloist.

CSO percussionist needs fast hands, and feet, to cover the challenge of a wild new concerto

Oct 2, 2019 – 2:47 pm
6/18/18 5:31:36 PM

Cynthia Yeh Photography in Studio

Hair by Alex Brown
Makeup by Stephanie Jeong

© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2018

Interview: If there is anyone in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra whose onstage attire should include a pair of sneakers, it is principal percussionist Cynthia Yeh, who will be at the center of attention for three concerts Oct. 3-5 as the soloist in the widely anticipated U.S. premiere of Avner Dorman’s free-wheeling concerto “Eternal Rhythm.”

‘Barber of Seville’ at Lyric Opera: Girl power prevails amid vocal fireworks, lots of laughs

Sep 30, 2019 – 6:43 pm
9/25/19 2:03:44 PM -- Chicago, IL USA
Lyric Opera of Chicago
The Barber of Seville Dress Rehearsal
Rossini 
Sir Andrew Davis conductor

© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2019

Review: In love and determined to get her way, an awesome spitfire turns to Figaro, the barber, for assistance in Rossini’s gleefully funny opera buffa, “The Barber of Seville.” It’s now playing at the Lyric Opera of Chicago in a Broadway style production, with sun-drenched Moorish touches, roving set pieces on wheels, and a motley crew of singing comedians. ★★★★

Muti and CSO begin Beethoven cycle with leap from alpha to titanic ‘Eroica’ as the true omega

Sep 27, 2019 – 3:29 pm
9/26/19 8:29:56 PM -- Chicago, IL USA
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Riccardo Muti, Conductor
Beethoven Consecration of the House Overture
Beethoven Symphony No. 1
Beethoven Symphony No. 3 (Eroica)

© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2019

Review: When the Chicago Symphony Orchestra had sounded the last blazing notes of Beethoven’s “Eroica” Symphony to end the first concert in a season-long traversal of the nine symphonies with music director Riccardo Muti, I found myself wondering: Where do we go from here? Onward, of course. But upward? In this most universally embracing and aspiring of musical forms, did Beethoven ever actually transcend the “Eroica,” mind you, his third symphony? What Muti and this virtuoso orchestra did with the monumental “Eroica,” on Sept. 26 at Orchestra Hall, was exhilarating to witness.

Muti, poised to lead CSO in Beethoven cycle, hears symphonies as nine cosmic questions

Sep 25, 2019 – 5:08 pm
Riccardo Muti on Beethoven feature image

Interview: Fresh from Italy’s Ravenna Festival, where he conducts and teaches every summer, Riccardo Muti, music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, is plunging into a season-long cycle through Beethoven’s symphonies in anticipation of the 250th anniversary of the composer’s birth in 1770. “It will be a document of my admiration and love for the Chicago Symphony,” Muti says. The venture begins with the First and Third Symphonies in concerts Sept. 26-28 at Orchestra Hall.

Davis to step down as Lyric’s music director; Italian Enrique Mazzola will take reins in 2021

Sep 13, 2019 – 5:53 pm
Enrique Mazzola

Report: Andrew Davis will step down as music director of the Lyric Opera of Chicago at the end of the 2020-21 season, to be succeeded by Italian conductor Enrique Mazzola, the company announced on Sept. 12. Mazzola, principal guest conductor at Deutsche Oper Berlin, and until recently artistic and music director of the Orchestre National d’Île-de-France in Paris, made his Lyric debut in 2016 with Donizetti’s “Lucia di Lammermoor.” He returned in 2018 to lead Bellini’s “I Puritani.” He will conduct Verdi’s “Luisa Miller” at the Lyric in October.

Even as Muti cast his light on Verdi’s ‘Aida,’ unplanned drama ruled over the CSO stage

Jun 26, 2019 – 10:34 am
6/21/19 7:52:10 PM -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Riccardo Muti conductor
Chicago Symphony Chorus
Duain Wolfe chorus director
Krassimira Stoyanova soprano (Aida)
Anita Rachvelishvili mezzo-soprano (Amneris)
Francesco Meli tenor (Radamès)
Kiril Manolov baritone (Amonasro)
Ildar Abdrazakov bass (Ramfis)
Eric Owens bass-baritone (The King)
Issachah Savage tenor (Messenger)
Kimberly Gunderson soprano (The Priestess)
Tasha Koontz soprano (The Priestess)


© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2019

Review: The soprano in the title role of Verdi’s “Aida” struggled with illness, only to be replaced in the second of three performances by a young singer who jumped in without rehearsal. And still the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus led by Riccardo Muti scored a general triumph in their season finale – thanks in no small part to mezzo-soprano Anita Rachvelishvili’s brilliant singing as Amneris.

Cellist Yo-Yo Ma draws a flood of enthusiasts for solo Bach marathon that ends with a romp

Jun 21, 2019 – 6:14 pm
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Review: The scene on the perimeter of Millennium Park in the early evening of June 20 looked a lot more like Lollapalooza than the turnout for a prodigious cello recital. The gathering throng was lined up for blocks, down Michigan Avenue and around the corner and up the Monroe Street hill – 20,000 enthusiasts patiently waiting to filter through security for a rare event, maybe the opportunity of a lifetime: to hear Yo-Yo Ma play J.S. Bach’s six suites for unaccompanied cello in a non-stop, two-and-a-half-hour immersion.

Secret’s out: North Shore Chamber Festival brings high-impact encounters to Northbrook

Jun 14, 2019 – 4:45 pm
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Review: The North Shore Chamber Music Festival is the Chicago-area classical scene’s best-kept secret. Anything but a run-of-the-mill suburban musical offering, it offers the kind of top-level talent typically heard downtown or in other major music centers. How is this possible in Northbrook? Thank local residents Vadim Gluzman, an internationally known violin soloist, and his wife, pianist Angela Yoffe, who founded the festival in 2011.

In glittering anniversary year, Grant Park Fest mixes Beethoven with usual unusual suspects

Jun 9, 2019 – 5:48 pm
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Preview: It’s a big-numbered year for the Grant Park Music Festival, which opens June 12 at the Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park. Not only does 2019 mark the free festival’s 85th anniversary, but it’s also the 15th summer for the Pritzker Pavilion and the 20th season at the festival helm for conductor Carlos Kalmar. Not surprisingly, Kalmar wanted to do grand things. The result measures up. The word for this celebratory season is Big.

Simone Young makes her CSO podium debut: Was this the stick that led a thousand firsts?

Jun 8, 2019 – 9:03 am
6/6/19 8:32:59 PM -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Simone Young, Conductor
Wagner Orchestral Excerpts from Götterdämmerung

© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2019

Review: Australian native Simone Young was the first woman to be appointed resident conductor of Opera Australia (1986), first to conduct the Vienna State Opera (1993) and the Vienna Philharmonic (2005) – as well as the first female conductor to record a complete cycle of Bruckner symphonies (2012) and a complete Wagner “Ring” cycle (2016). Her debut with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on June 6 at Orchestra Hall left a mixed impression.

Lyric’s Ryan Center singers, Civic Orchestra produce plenty of sparkle on a shared stage

Jun 7, 2019 – 12:16 pm
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Review: Spirits were high and the audience could hardly have been more receptive when singers from the Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Ryan Center for professional training collaborated with the Civic Orchestra of Chicago in an evening of opera arias and scenes June 5 at Orchestra Hall. The concert conducted by Michael Christie sampled a nicely varied mix of four operas from the 18th-20th centuries.

Partnering of Chicago Symphony and Joffrey shows promise despite limits in staging ballet

Jun 1, 2019 – 2:18 pm
5/30/19 10:03:27 PM -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Matthias Pintscher conductor
The Joffrey Ballet
Ashley Wheater The Mary B. Galvin Artistic Director

© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2019

Review: With exquisite music and lovely dancers, the idea of engaging in some cross-cultural pollination between the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Joffrey Ballet made perfect sense. But without an ideal dance floor, theatrical lighting or entrance-exit options, the Symphony Center experiment, which included the world premiere of Stephanie Martinez’s “Bliss!” set to music of Stravinsky, didn’t quite work.

With Orchestra Hall again open for business, Uchida and Kissin electrify capacity houses

May 12, 2019 – 10:16 pm
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Review: The piano was at center stage, and all seemed right with the world in the happy, normal – actually, quite thrilling – aftermath of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s protracted strike. Many an anticipated concert got wiped out by the strike, but the timing favored two pianists who happen to be favorites at Orchestra Hall: Mitsuko Uchida, who gave a memorable performance of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor with the CSO under Riccardo Muti (May 9-11), and Evgeny Kissin, who offered a typically thoughtful, brilliant and roaringly received recital May 12.

‘West Side Story’ at Lyric Opera of Chicago:
New love and old hatred stirred at high heat

May 9, 2019 – 9:43 am
5/2/19 2:46:06 PM -- Chicago, IL

Lyric Opera Chicago
West Side Story Dress Rehearsal



© Todd Rosenberg Photography 2019

Review: By now, Lyric Opera of Chicago can claim an impressive string of spring musicals, hugely popular explorations of classic Americana that appear like shining exclamation marks at the end of regular opera seasons. The latest, “West Side Story,” well may be the finest. Indeed, you might be hard pressed ever to find a more profoundly satisfying account of this exquisite music-drama, which shares with its model, Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” both its bittersweet hope and its timeless tragedy. ★★★★★